How Many Glasses of Champagne Equals One Shot of Liquor?

The percent of alcohol in champagne is approximately 12.2% which compares to 12.5% for red wine and 18.8% for dessert wine. In essence, drinking a four ounce glass of champagne is similar to drink a four ounce glass of wine. Remember that one shot of most liquors is equal to one four ounce glass of wine. That being said, it must be understood that alcohol that is combined with carbonation can often accelerate the buzz/drunkenness felt by the person consuming the beverage.

Some individuals have had a “black out” drunk experience off champagne or dessert wine yet they can drink several shots of whiskey or gin and not feel the same effects in such a short amount of time. When drinking any type of carbonated alcoholic beverage please be aware of the fact that it can get you drunk quicker. While the numbers state that one four ounce glass of champagne is equal to one shot of liquor it can often seem like the champagne is much stronger.

For more on the color of wine and the alcohol by content please use our resource here: Does the Color of Wine Determine the Alcohol by Content? Below find the statistics on alcohol content by volume for different types of wine:

Number of standard drinks – wine

Red wine 12.5% alc. vol

100 ml standard serve – 1 standard drink
150 ml average restaurant serving – 1.5 standard drinks
750 ml bottle – 7.7 standard drinks
2 litre cask – 21 standard drinks
4 litre cask – 41 standard drinks

White wine 11.5% alc. vol

100 ml standard serve – 0.9 standard drink
150 ml average restaurant serving – 1.4 standard drinks
750 ml bottle – 6.8 standard drinks
2 litre cask – 18 standard drinks
4 litre cask – 36 standard drinks

Champagne 12.2% alc. vol

150 ml average restaurant serving – 1.4 standard drinks
750 ml bottle – 7.1 standard drinks

Remember that if you get a DUI citation there is the potential for a reckless endangerment charge that could be added. This is a Class A misdemeanor which is the same level as a first time DUI. If you need defense against DUI or reckless endangerment charges please feel free to contact me at 503-477-5040. Fighting these criminal charges could save you quite a bit of time in jail and/or money for the citation.

Multnomah County, Clackamas County, and Washington County Oregon DUI Statistics

Drunk driving in the United States is nearly an epidemic. According to the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 29.1 million people have admitted to driving drunk at one time or another in their life, which is more than the population of Texas. 23.1% of those people are between the ages of 21 to 25 years old, and the average drunk driver has driven while intoxicated upwards of 80 times before being arrested. Even scarier stats: every two minutes, a person is injured in a drunk driving-related accident; and, as of 2013, someone is killed every 52 minutes by a drunk driver.

So, where does Oregon stand in all of this? Aside from a 19.3% increase in drunk driving-related deaths from last year, according to MADD.org, Oregon is making improvements in the state drunk driving laws, which in turn is causing a decrease in DUII arrests, and an overall drop in death tolls. So, how are some Oregon counties stacking up to the state records? Here are three that are working towards lowering their DUII arrest rates and making the entire state a safer place to drive:

Multnomah County

Multnomah County is the most populous county in Oregon, because it houses Oregon’s largest city, Portland. A steadily-increasing population means additional drivers on the roads, some making very poor decisions when it comes to drinking and driving. But, aside from a spike in DUII arrests in 2004 (4,171), Multnomah County has seen a nice decrease in drunk driving arrests, averaging about 3,200 per year between 1998 and 2008.

Washington County

Washington County, Oregon, is the second-most populous county in the state, boasting 529,710 people as of the 2010 census. Of those 529,710 people, around 2,700 were arrested in 2008 on DUII charges, the third most of the ten year period that spans the DUII Data Book (oregon.gov/ODOT). This was the same year that the state of Oregon as a whole saw a 1.1% decrease in DUII arrests.

Clackamas County

Clackamas is the third-largest county in Oregon, and with a 50,000 person increase in population over ten years, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office has seen a 2,200 DUII arrest increase over that same amount of time. The lowest number of arrests took place in the year 2000; the highest, in 2002.

Though statistics are never fun and sometimes hard to read, it is important that everyone in every state know the reality of the drunk driving situation in and around the areas in which they live. A proactive and staunch approach to drinking and driving (each a separate activity) will make everyone’s lives happier and safer, no matter where they live.

If you or someone you know has been charged with a DUII in the state of Oregon, contact Portland DUI/DUII lawyer Andy Green.

General State of Oregon DUI and MIP Citations

Drunk driving in the United States is nearly an epidemic. According to the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 29.1 million people have admitted to driving drunk at one time or another in their life, which is more than the population of Texas. 23.1% of those people are between the ages of 21 to 25 years old, and the average drunk driver has driven while intoxicated upwards of 80 times before being arrested. Even scarier stats: every two minutes, a person is injured in a drunk driving-related accident; and, as of 2013, someone is killed every 52 minutes by a drunk driver.

So, where does Oregon stand in all of this? According to MADD.org, Oregon is a “three star” state out of five, having made major improvements in the state drunk driving laws over the last eight years. The Oregon DUII Data Book, covering the years 1998 through 2008, shows that car crashes as a result of drunk driving that cause fatalities and injuries has decreased from 19,284 in 1999 to 18,409 in 2008. And, DUII offenses have decreased by 1.1% over the ten-year period, which is impressive considering the 14.8% increase in population during that time in Oregon state. For those convicted, the number of diversion agreements (or, an alternative sentence to jail time) has also decreased, by 11.6%, which presumably means harsher sentencing from Oregon state judges.

On the subject of young people under the influence, Minor in Possession (MIP) citations have been cut in half since 1998, decreasing from 14,849 to 7,762 by 2008. In that same year, 718 juveniles were denied their license privileges, presumably because of past citations and/or convictions. Most importantly, though, the number of fatalities in people under the age of 21 has decreased in Oregon, again almost by half. In 1998, 77 youths died alcohol-related deaths, and in 2008, that number was 34. But, all of these statistics, though good and evident of progress, do not mean that the hard work is over. The fact of the matter is, there are still drunk drivers out on the roads, in Oregon and everywhere else, and young people experimenting with drugs and alcohol before getting behind the wheel. Diligence on the part of our law enforcement officers to educate citizens and stop dangerous driving in action will eradicate drunk driving and make the necessity of these statistics a thing of the past.

If you or someone you know has been charged with a DUII in the state of Oregon, contact Portland DUI/DUII lawyer Andy Green.

Can I Get a DUI or DUII For a Single Drink If I Am underage?

Drinking underage is a huge risk that can affect the rest of your life if you are caught. Though it can be potentially fun and exciting as, say, a teenager to engage in alcohol-related activities, it can also be dangerous and possibly fatal to those involved. That is why the only times that minors are legally allowed to imbibe are:

  1. In a private setting (such as a home) in the presence or with the permission of a legal guardian or consenting adult
  2. For religious purposes (such as the drinking of sacramental wine in a church)
  3. For government work (in a controlled setting for research purposes)

In Oregon, the rate of underage drinking is exponentially higher than it is in other states. And, the rate of alcohol-related auto fatalities caused by underage drivers versus those caused by drivers 21 years of age and older is also much higher. Therefore, the state has very strict laws and regulations when it comes to DUI’s and underage drinking.

Oregon’s DUI laws are the same for a minor as they are for an adult. This means that, if a person or persons under the age of 21 are pulled over while driving and are in suspicion of drinking, and their BAC (blood alcohol content) is anything above 00.00%, they could be charged with a DUI. The penalties of an underage DUI charge include imprisonment, fines, and license suspension. In addition, an underage driver could also be charged with distributing alcohol to (other) minors, possession of alcohol, solicitation of alcohol, child endangerment, and more, depending on the specifics of the situation.

If you or someone you know has been charged with an underage DUII in the state of Oregon, contact me at 503-477-5040 or you can use my contact page here.

Is There a Breathalyzer App for the iPhone or an Android Phone?

Nowadays, it seems like we have an app for everything: getting directions, keeping track of our calories, and even finding parking spaces on crowded city blocks. There are also apps that, for a minimal cost, can act as a breathalyzer and test the level of alcohol in your bloodstream. So, how does this technology work? And what are the options out there for iPhone and Android phone users? And more importantly, is it at all reliable?

First, the technology of a breathalyzer app varies between providers, but the first step almost always involves downloading said app to your smartphone. Some of these apps are free, and some will cost you. Some, like “Can I Drive Yet?” on Apple’s App Store, act as a calculator. The user inputs their age, sex, weight, height, and how much they’ve had to drink, and the app provides an estimate of their BAC, or Blood Alcohol Content. Others are components of a larger system that involves connecting an actual breathalyzer to your phone, physically or via Bluetooth, that will give you a reading on your screen. Some of the top-rated apps out there include BACtrack, Alcohoot, and Breathometer. These products range in price from $30 to $150, and they also range in size. Some, like The Original Breathometer or the BACtrack Go or Vio, can fit in your pocket or on a keychain. The Breathometer is wearable and doesn’t require a disposable mouthpiece. And almost all employ what is called Back To Zero technology, which predicts when you will be back at a 0% BAC, or at the very least, a safe level to drive.

iphone-breathalyzer-app

Speaking of safety, the jury is still out on the effectiveness and accuracy of these apps and their external components. A Today Show experiment conducted back in August of last year showed a wide range of test results for these apps, some that doubled the participants’ BAC, and some that underrated the results of the breathalyzer by 66%, a dangerous dip for someone considering whether or not to get behind the wheel. The general consensus among law enforcement is that if you are questioning your level of sobriety, you don’t need an app to tell you not to drive. The one positive of these apps is that it does allow access to so much information through our smartphones. Specifically, through the apps of the three aforementioned top contenders (BACtrack, Alcohoot, and Breathometer), a person can find nearby restaurants, open hotels, and call a cab or Uber car to get them home safely.

For more information on DUII citations and how breathalyzer tests work please access our valuable resource on breathalyzer tests in Oregon here. If you have any questions as it relates to a DUII or breathalyzer test do not hesitate to reach out to me today. You can contact me at 1-503-477-5040. I will be more than happy to help you as a successful Portland DUI Lawyer.

Does the Color of Wine Determine the Alcohol by Content?

Alcohol is a major part of many people’s lives. It is a gateway to socializing on weekends or after work, it compliments our meals, and it also, when used responsibly, can make us feel pretty good and relaxed. Wine especially achieves all of those things. There are parties and events devoted to wine tastings, stores devoted to helping you find the right bottle to pair with a steak or fancy cheese, and the overall act of drinking wine—from the uncorking to the pour into a long-stemmed glass, to the process of taking that first sip—invokes feelings of class and elegance. There is a lot to learn about wine, especially about the difference between the two colors of white and red, and how that affects you when you drink it.

First off, what exactly is wine? Wine is the pressed juice that comes from fermented grapes. That is, of course, a very simple way of breaking down a complicated and arduous process which involves growing specific types of grapes for a predetermined amount of time in the right kind of weather, harvesting them, pressing the juice, aging it in a barrel, and bottling it up for consumption.

The species of grape used to make wine has very much to do with the composition of the wine itself. The skin, pulp, and stems of the wine will determine the color, the flavor, and the amount of tannins, or natural preservatives, in the wine. Red wines are made with red or dark grapes, and white wine can be made with either white (“green”) or dark-skinned grapes. The type of grape will also determine where the wine is from (a warmer or cooler climate), how long they must grow on the vine and when they should be harvested, and how long the juice must ferment. The difference in color between white and red wines is that the skins of the grapes are removed after pressing for a white wine, and they are left intact for red wines. Again, the colors within these two main types will also vary depending on the factors listed above.

So, which of these wines has the higher alcohol content? In general, red wines will have a higher alcohol by volume (ABV), but this will vary from wine to wine. Alcohol comes from the fermentation of the sugar in the grape, and the riper the grape, the higher the sugar content. Typically, red wine grapes are left on the vine to ripen much longer than white wine grapes, so their alcohol content is higher, but you could also hypothetically do the same with a white wine grape, upping that wine’s alcohol content as well. If ever in doubt about a wine’s alcohol content, check the bottle’s label. The percentage of alcohol by volume will always be there, so that you can be well-informed before you imbibe.

What is an Ignition Interlock Device and Will I Need One After a DUI?

A DUI (or, driving under the influence) is the crime of operating a motor vehicle, such as a car or truck, while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Sometimes known as a DWI, or a DUII in the state of Oregon, DUI charges are determined by testing the BAC, or Blood Alcohol Content, of the driver. BAC measures the amount of alcohol in your bloodstream through a breathalyzer test. The limitations vary from state-to-state, but if your BAC is in excess of 0.05% to 0.08%, you would more than likely be charged with a DUI.  The higher your BAC, and the severity of the offense (for example, a routine stop versus a fatal car accident), the more intense your punishment may be.

After an arrest for a DUI, a driver will typically have their license suspended. A first offense may mean a suspension for 90 days to one calendar year. A first DUI conviction will result in a one year license suspension. A second conviction will be three years. And again, if the DUI is issued as the result of an accident that has caused major or fatal injuries to another party, there could be fines and jail time in addition to a license suspension.

There is no license suspension in the Oregon DUII Diversion Program, but participants are required to use an IID (Ignition Interlock Device). IID’s are just like they sound: devices that are installed in the ignition of a car that require a breath sample from the driver before they are allowed to turn the engine of their vehicle on. If the IID detects a trace of alcohol, the ignition will lock until a clean sample can be provided. The driver is responsible for all costs of the IID, including purchase of the device, installation, maintenance, and removal, throughout the course of the sentence. In the state of Oregon, anyone entered into a DUII Diversion Agreement must install the device, and anyone convicted of a DUII in court must also install the device in order to have their license reinstated.

If you or someone you know has been charged with a DUII in the state of Oregon, contact Portland DUI/DUII lawyer me at 1-503-477-5040